Chapter 17. Test Fixtures, Logging, and Server-Side Debugging

Now that we have a functional authentication system, we want to use it to identify users, and be able to show them all the lists they have created.

To do that, we’re going to have to write FTs that have a logged-in user. Rather than making each test go through the (time-consuming) Persona dialog, we want to be able to skip that part.

This is about separation of concerns. Functional tests aren’t like unit tests, in that they don’t usually have a single assertion. But, conceptually, they should be testing a single thing. There’s no need for every single FT to test the login/logout mechanisms. If we can figure out a way to "cheat" and skip that part, we’ll spend less time waiting for duplicated test paths.

Don’t overdo de-duplication in FTs. One of the benefits of an FT is that it can catch strange and unpredictable interactions between different parts of your application.

Skipping the Login Process by Pre-creating a Session

It’s quite common for a user to return to a site and still have a cookie, which means they are "pre-authenticated", so this isn’t an unrealistic cheat at all. Here’s how you can set it up:

functional_tests/test_my_lists.py. 

from django.conf import settings
from django.contrib.auth import BACKEND_SESSION_KEY, SESSION_KEY, get_user_model
User = get_user_model()
from django.contrib.sessions.backends.db import SessionStore

from .base import FunctionalTest


class MyListsTest(FunctionalTest):

    def create_pre_authenticated_session(self, email):
        user = User.objects.create(email=email)
        session = SessionStore()
        session[SESSION_KEY] = user.pk #1
        session[BACKEND_SESSION_KEY] = settings.AUTHENTICATION_BACKENDS[0]
        session.save()
        ## to set a cookie we need to first visit the domain.
        ## 404 pages load the quickest!
        self.browser.get(self.server_url + "/404_no_such_url/")
        self.browser.add_cookie(dict(
            name=settings.SESSION_COOKIE_NAME,
            value=session.session_key, #2
            path='/',
        ))

1

We create a session object in the database. The session key is the primary key of the user object (which is actually their email address).

2

We then add a cookie to the browser that matches the session on the server—on our next visit to the site, the server should recognise us as a logged-in user.

Note that, as it is, this will only work because we’re using LiveServerTestCase, so the User and Session objects we create will end up in the same database as the test server. Later we’ll need to modify it so that it works against the database on the staging server too.

Checking It Works

To check it works, it would be good to use the wait_to_be_logged_in function we defined in our last test. To access it from a different test, we’ll need to pull it up into FunctionalTest, as well as a couple of other methods. We’ll also tweak them slightly so that they can take an arbitrary email address as a parameter:

functional_tests/base.py (ch17l002-2). 

from selenium.webdriver.support.ui import WebDriverWait
[...]

class FunctionalTest(StaticLiveServerTestCase):
    [...]

    def wait_for_element_with_id(self, element_id):
        [...]


    def wait_to_be_logged_in(self, email):
        self.wait_for_element_with_id('id_logout')
        navbar = self.browser.find_element_by_css_selector('.navbar')
        self.assertIn(email, navbar.text)


    def wait_to_be_logged_out(self, email):
        self.wait_for_element_with_id('id_login')
        navbar = self.browser.find_element_by_css_selector('.navbar')
        self.assertNotIn(email, navbar.text)

That means a small tweak in test_login.py:

functional_tests/test_login.py (ch17l003). 

TEST_EMAIL = 'edith@mockmyid.com'
[...]

    def test_login_with_persona(self):
        [...]

        self.browser.find_element_by_id(
            'authentication_email'
        ).send_keys(TEST_EMAIL)
        self.browser.find_element_by_tag_name('button').click()

        [...]

        # She can see that she is logged in
        self.wait_to_be_logged_in(email=TEST_EMAIL)
        [...]
        self.wait_to_be_logged_in(email=TEST_EMAIL)
        [...]
        self.wait_to_be_logged_out(email=TEST_EMAIL)
        [...]
        self.wait_to_be_logged_out(email=TEST_EMAIL)

Just to check we haven’t broken anything, we rerun the login test:

$ python3 manage.py test functional_tests.test_login
[...]
OK

And now we can write a placeholder for the "My Lists" test, to see if our pre-authenticated session creator really does work:

functional_tests/test_my_lists.py (ch17l004). 

    def test_logged_in_users_lists_are_saved_as_my_lists(self):
        email = 'edith@example.com'

        self.browser.get(self.server_url)
        self.wait_to_be_logged_out(email)

        # Edith is a logged-in user
        self.create_pre_authenticated_session(email)

        self.browser.get(self.server_url)
        self.wait_to_be_logged_in(email)

That gets us:

$ python3 manage.py test functional_tests.test_my_lists
[...]
OK

That’s a good place for a commit:

$ git add functional_tests
$ git commit -m "placeholder test_my_lists and move login checkers into base"

The Proof Is in the Pudding: Using Staging to Catch Final Bugs

That’s all very well for running the FTs locally, but how would it work against the staging server? Let’s try and deploy our site. Along the way we’ll catch an unexpected bug (that’s what staging is for!), and then we’ll have to figure out a way of managing the database on the test server.

$ cd deploy_tools
$ fab deploy --host=elspeth@superlists-staging.ottg.eu
[...]

And restart Gunicorn…

elspeth@server: sudo restart gunicorn-superlists-staging.ottg.eu

Here’s what happens when we run the functional tests:

$ python3 manage.py test functional_tests \
--liveserver=superlists-staging.ottg.eu

======================================================================
ERROR: test_login_with_persona (functional_tests.test_login.LoginTest)
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/worskpace/functional_tests/test_login.py", line 50, in
test_login_with_persona
[...]
    self.wait_for_element_with_id('id_logout')
[...]
selenium.common.exceptions.TimeoutException: Message: Could not find element
with id id_logout. Page text was:
Superlists
Sign in
Start a new To-Do list

======================================================================
ERROR: test_logged_in_users_lists_are_saved_as_my_lists
(functional_tests.test_my_lists.MyListsTest)
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/worskpace/functional_tests/test_my_lists.py", line 34, in
test_logged_in_users_lists_are_saved_as_my_lists
    self.wait_to_be_logged_in(email)
[...]
selenium.common.exceptions.TimeoutException: Message: Could not find element
with id id_logout. Page text was:
Superlists
Sign in
Start a new To-Do list

We can’t log in—either with the real Persona or with our pre-authenticated session. There’s some kind of bug.

I had considered just going back and fixing this in the previous chapter, and pretending it never happened, but I think leaving it illustrates the point of running tests against a staging environment. It would have been pretty embarrassing if we’d deployed this bug straight to our live site.

Aside from that, we’ll get to practice a bit of server-side debugging.

Setting Up Logging

In order to track this bug down, we have to set up Gunicorn to do some logging. Adjust the Gunicorn config on the server, using vi or nano:

server: /etc/init/gunicorn-superlists-staging.ottg.eu.conf. 

[...]
exec ../virtualenv/bin/gunicorn \
    --bind unix:/tmp/superlists-staging.ottg.eu.socket \
    --access-logfile ../access.log \
    --error-logfile ../error.log \
    superlists.wsgi:application

That will put an access log and error log into the ~/sites/$SITENAME folder. Then we add some debug calls in our authenticate function (again, we can do this directly on the server):

accounts/authentication.py. 

import logging
[...]

    def authenticate(self, assertion):
        logging.warning('entering authenticate function')
        response = requests.post(
            PERSONA_VERIFY_URL,
            data={'assertion': assertion, 'audience': settings.DOMAIN}
        )
        logging.warning('got response from persona')
        logging.warning(response.content.decode())
        [...]

Using the "root" logger like this (logging.warning) isn’t generally a good idea. We’ll set up a more robust logging configuration at the end of the chapter.

You should also make sure your settings.py still contains the LOGGING settings which will actually send stuff to the console:

superlists/settings.py. 

LOGGING = {
    'version': 1,
    'disable_existing_loggers': False,
    'handlers': {
        'console': {
            'level': 'DEBUG',
            'class': 'logging.StreamHandler',
        },
    },
    'loggers': {
        'django': {
            'handlers': ['console'],
        },
    },
    'root': {'level': 'INFO'},
}

We restart Gunicorn again, and then either rerun the FT, or just try to log in manually. While that happens, we can watch the logs on the server with a:

elspeth@server: $ tail -f error.log  # assumes we are in ~/sites/$SITENAME folder
[...]
WARNING:root:{"status":"failure","reason":"audience mismatch: domain mismatch"}

You may even find the page gets stuck in a "redirect loop", as Persona tries to resubmit the assertion again and again.

It turns out it’s because I overlooked an important part of the Persona system, which is that authentications are only valid for particular domains. We’ve left the domain hardcoded as "localhost" in accounts/authentication.py:

accounts/authentication.py. 

PERSONA_VERIFY_URL = 'https://verifier.login.persona.org/verify'
DOMAIN = 'localhost'
User = get_user_model()

We can try and hack in a fix on the server:

accounts/authentication.py. 

DOMAIN = 'superlists-staging.ottg.eu'

And check whether it works by doing a manual login. It does.

Fixing the Persona Bug

Here’s how we go about baking in a fix, switching back to coding on our local PC. We start by moving the definition for the DOMAIN variable into settings.py, where we can later use the deploy script to override it:

superlists/settings.py (ch17l011). 

# This setting is changed by the deploy script
DOMAIN = "localhost"

ALLOWED_HOSTS = [DOMAIN]

We feed that change back through the tests:

accounts/tests/test_authentication.py. 

@@ -1,12 +1,14 @@
 from unittest.mock import patch
+from django.conf import settings
 from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model
 from django.test import TestCase
 User = get_user_model()

 from accounts.authentication import (
-    PERSONA_VERIFY_URL, DOMAIN, PersonaAuthenticationBackend
+    PERSONA_VERIFY_URL, PersonaAuthenticationBackend
 )

+
 @patch('accounts.authentication.requests.post')
 class AuthenticateTest(TestCase):

@@ -21,7 +23,7 @@ class AuthenticateTest(TestCase):
         self.backend.authenticate('an assertion')
         mock_post.assert_called_once_with(
             PERSONA_VERIFY_URL,
-            data={'assertion': 'an assertion', 'audience': DOMAIN}
+            data={'assertion': 'an assertion', 'audience': settings.DOMAIN}
         )

And then we change the implementation:

accounts/authentication.py. 

@@ -1,8 +1,8 @@
 import requests
+from django.conf import settings
 from django.contrib.auth import get_user_model
 User = get_user_model()

 PERSONA_VERIFY_URL = 'https://verifier.login.persona.org/verify'
-DOMAIN = 'localhost'


@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ class PersonaAuthenticationBackend(object):
     def authenticate(self, assertion):
         response = requests.post(
             PERSONA_VERIFY_URL,
-            data={'assertion': assertion, 'audience': DOMAIN}
+            data={'assertion': assertion, 'audience': settings.DOMAIN}
         )
        if response.ok and response.json()['status'] == 'okay':
            email = response.json()['email']

Rerunning the tests just to be sure:

$ python3 manage.py test accounts
[...]
Ran 14 tests in 0.053s
OK

Next we update our fabfile to make it adjust the domain in settings.py, removing the cumbersome two-line sed on ALLOWED_HOSTS:

deploy_tools/fabfile.py. 

def _update_settings(source_folder, site_name):
    settings_path = source_folder + '/superlists/settings.py'
    sed(settings_path, "DEBUG = True", "DEBUG = False")
    sed(settings_path, 'DOMAIN = "localhost"', 'DOMAIN = "%s"' % (site_name,))
    secret_key_file = source_folder + '/superlists/secret_key.py'
    if not exists(secret_key_file):
        [...]

We redeploy, and spot the sed in the output:

$ fab deploy --host=superlists-staging.ottg.eu
[...]
[superlists-staging.ottg.eu] run: sed -i.bak -r -e s/DOMAIN =
"localhost"/DOMAIN = "superlists-staging.ottg.eu"/g "$(echo
/home/harry/sites/superlists-staging.ottg.eu/source/superlists/settings.py)"
[...]

Managing the Test Database on Staging

Now we can rerun our FTs, and get to the next failure: our attempt to create pre-authenticated sessions doesn’t work, so the "My Lists" test fails:

$ python3 manage.py test functional_tests \
--liveserver=superlists-staging.ottg.eu

ERROR: test_logged_in_users_lists_are_saved_as_my_lists
(functional_tests.test_my_lists.MyListsTest)
[...]
selenium.common.exceptions.TimeoutException: Message: Could not find element
with id id_logout. Page text was:
Superlists
Sign in
Start a new To-Do list

Ran 7 tests in 72.742s

FAILED (errors=1)

It’s because our test utility function create_pre_authenticated_session only acts on the local database. Let’s find out how our tests can manage the database on the server.

A Django Management Command to Create Sessions

To do things on the server, we’ll need to build a self-contained script that can be run from the command line on the server, most probably via Fabric.

When trying to build standalone scripts that work with the Django environment, can talk to the database and so on, there are some fiddly issues you need to get right, like setting the DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE environment variable correctly, and getting the sys.path right. Instead of messing about with all that, Django lets you create your own "management commands" (commands you can run with python manage.py), which will do all that path mangling for you. They live in a folder called management/commands inside your apps:

$ mkdir -p functional_tests/management/commands
$ touch functional_tests/management/__init__.py
$ touch functional_tests/management/commands/__init__.py

The boilerplate in a management command is a class that inherits from django.core.management.BaseCommand, and that defines a method called handle:

functional_tests/management/commands/create_session.py. 

from django.conf import settings
from django.contrib.auth import BACKEND_SESSION_KEY, SESSION_KEY, get_user_model
User = get_user_model()
from django.contrib.sessions.backends.db import SessionStore
from django.core.management.base import BaseCommand


class Command(BaseCommand):

    def add_arguments(self, parser):
        parser.add_argument('email')

    def handle(self, *args, **options):
        session_key = create_pre_authenticated_session(options['email'])
        self.stdout.write(session_key)


def create_pre_authenticated_session(email):
    user = User.objects.create(email=email)
    session = SessionStore()
    session[SESSION_KEY] = user.pk
    session[BACKEND_SESSION_KEY] = settings.AUTHENTICATION_BACKENDS[0]
    session.save()
    return session.session_key

We’ve taken the code for create_pre_authenticated_session code from test_my_lists.py. handle will pick up an email address from the parser, and then return the session key that we’ll want to add to our browser cookies, and the management command prints it out at the command line. Try it out:

$ python3 manage.py create_session a@b.com
Unknown command: 'create_session'

One more step: we need to add functional_tests to our settings.py for it to recognise it as a real app that might have management commands as well as tests:

superlists/settings.py. 

+++ b/superlists/settings.py
@@ -42,6 +42,7 @@ INSTALLED_APPS = (
     'lists',
     'accounts',
+    'functional_tests',
 )

Now it works:

$ python3 manage.py create_session a@b.com
qnslckvp2aga7tm6xuivyb0ob1akzzwl

If you see an error saying the auth_user table is missing, you may need to run manage.py migrate. In case that doesn’t work, delete the db.sqlite3 file and run migrate again, to get a clean slate.

Getting the FT to Run the Management Command on the Server

Next we need to adjust test_my_lists so that it runs the local function when we’re on the local server, and make it run the management command on the staging server if we’re on that:

functional_tests/test_my_lists.py (ch17l016). 

from django.conf import settings
from .base import FunctionalTest
from .server_tools import create_session_on_server
from .management.commands.create_session import create_pre_authenticated_session

class MyListsTest(FunctionalTest):

    def create_pre_authenticated_session(self, email):
        if self.against_staging:
            session_key = create_session_on_server(self.server_host, email)
        else:
            session_key = create_pre_authenticated_session(email)
        ## to set a cookie we need to first visit the domain.
        ## 404 pages load the quickest!
        self.browser.get(self.server_url + "/404_no_such_url/")
        self.browser.add_cookie(dict(
            name=settings.SESSION_COOKIE_NAME,
            value=session_key,
            path='/',
        ))

    [...]

Let’s see how we know whether or not we’re working against the staging server. self.against_staging gets populated in base.py:

functional_tests/base.py (ch17l017). 

from .server_tools import reset_database  #1

class FunctionalTest(StaticLiveServerTestCase):

    @classmethod
    def setUpClass(cls):
        for arg in sys.argv:
            if 'liveserver' in arg:
                cls.server_host = arg.split('=')[1] #2
                cls.server_url = 'http://' + cls.server_host
                cls.against_staging = True #3
                return
        super().setUpClass()
        cls.against_staging = False
        cls.server_url = cls.live_server_url

    @classmethod
    def tearDownClass(cls):
        if not cls.against_staging:
            super().tearDownClass()

    def setUp(self):
        if self.against_staging:
            reset_database(self.server_host) #4
        self.browser = webdriver.Firefox()
        self.browser.implicitly_wait(3)

2 3

Instead of just storing cls.server_url, we also store the server_host and against_staging attributes if we detect the liveserver command-line argument.

1 4

We also need a way of resetting the server database in between each test. I’ll explain the logic of the session-creation code, which should also explain how this works.

An Additional Hop via subprocess

Because our tests are Python 3, we can’t directly call our Fabric functions, which are Python 2. Instead, we have to do an extra hop and call the fab command as a new process, like we do from the command line when we do server deploys. Here’s how that looks, in a module called server_tools:

functional_tests/server_tools.py. 

from os import path
import subprocess
THIS_FOLDER = path.dirname(path.abspath(__file__))

def create_session_on_server(host, email):
    return subprocess.check_output(
        [
            'fab',
            'create_session_on_server:email={}'.format(email), #12
            '--host={}'.format(host),
            '--hide=everything,status', #3
        ],
        cwd=THIS_FOLDER
    ).decode().strip() #4


def reset_database(host):
    subprocess.check_call(
        ['fab', 'reset_database', '--host={}'.format(host)],
        cwd=THIS_FOLDER
    )

Here we use the subprocess module to call some Fabric functions using the fab command.

1

As you can see, the command-line syntax for arguments to fab functions is quite simple, a colon and then a variable=argument syntax.

2

Incidentally, this is also the first time I’ve shown the "new-style" string formatting syntax. As you can see it uses curly brackets {} instead of %s. I slightly prefer it to the old style, but you’re bound to come across both if you spend any time with Python. Take a look at some of the examples in the Python docs to learn more.

3 4

Because of all the hopping around via Fabric and subprocesses, we’re forced to be quite careful about extracting the session key as a string from the output of the command as it gets run on the server.

You may need to adapt the call to subprocess if you are using a custom username or password: make it match the fab arguments you use when you run the automated deployment script.

By the time you read this book, Fabric may well have been fully ported to Python 3. If so, investigate using the Fabric context managers to call Fabric functions directly inline with your code.

Finally, let’s look at the fabfile that defines those two commands we want to run server side, to reset the database or set up the session:

functional_tests/fabfile.py. 

from fabric.api import env, run


def _get_base_folder(host):
    return '~/sites/' + host

def _get_manage_dot_py(host):
    return '{path}/virtualenv/bin/python {path}/source/manage.py'.format(
        path=_get_base_folder(host)
    )


def reset_database():
    run('{manage_py} flush --noinput'.format(
        manage_py=_get_manage_dot_py(env.host)
    ))


def create_session_on_server(email):
    session_key = run('{manage_py} create_session {email}'.format(
        manage_py=_get_manage_dot_py(env.host),
        email=email,
    ))
    print(session_key)

Does that make a reasonable amount of sense? We’ve got a function that can create a session in the database. If we detect we’re running locally, we call it directly. If we’re against the server, there’s a couple of hops: we use subprocess to get to Fabric via fab, which lets us run a management command that calls that same function, on the server.

How about an ASCII-art illustration?

Locally: 

MyListsTest
.create_pre_authenticated_session --> .management.commands.create_session
                                      .create_pre_authenticated_session

Against staging: 

MyListsTest
.create_pre_authenticated_session     .management.commands.create_session
                                      .create_pre_authenticated_session
     |
    \|/                                             /|\
                                                     |
server_tools
.create_session_on_server               run manage.py create_session

     |                                              /|\
    \|/                                              |

subprocess.check_output  -->   fab  -->  fabfile.create_session_on_server

Anyway, let’s see if it works. First, locally, to check we didn’t break anything:

$ python3 manage.py test functional_tests.test_my_lists
[...]
OK

Next, against the server. We push our code up first:

$ git push  # you'll need to commit changes first.
$ cd deploy_tools
$ fab deploy --host=superlists-staging.ottg.eu

And now we run the test—notice we can include elspeth@ in the specification of the liveserver argument now:

$ python3 manage.py test functional_tests.test_my_lists \
--liveserver=elspeth@superlists-staging.ottg.eu
Creating test database for alias 'default'...
[superlists-staging.ottg.eu] Executing task 'reset_database'
~/sites/superlists-staging.ottg.eu/source/manage.py flush --noinput
[superlists-staging.ottg.eu] out: Syncing...
[superlists-staging.ottg.eu] out: Creating tables ...
[...]
.
 ---------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 1 test in 25.701s

OK

Looking good! We can rerun all the tests to make sure…

$ python3 manage.py test functional_tests \
--liveserver=elspeth@superlists-staging.ottg.eu
Creating test database for alias 'default'...
[superlists-staging.ottg.eu] Executing task 'reset_database'
[...]
Ran 7 tests in 89.494s

OK
Destroying test database for alias 'default'...

Hooray!

I’ve shown one way of managing the test database, but you could experiment with others—for example, if you were using MySQL or Postgres, you could open up an SSH tunnel to the server, and use port forwarding to talk to the database directly. You could then amend settings.DATABASES during FTs to talk to the tunnelled port.

Baking In Our Logging Code

Before we finish, let’s "bake in" our logging code. It would be useful to keep our new logging code in there, under source control, so that we can debug any future login problems. They may indicate someone is up to no good, after all.

Let’s start by saving the Gunicorn config to our template file in deploy_tools:

deploy_tools/gunicorn-upstart.template.conf. 

[...]
chdir /home/elspeth/sites/SITENAME/source

exec ../virtualenv/bin/gunicorn \
    --bind unix:/tmp/SITENAME.socket \
    --access-logfile ../access.log \
    --error-logfile ../error.log \
    superlists.wsgi:application

Using Hierarchical Logging Config

When we hacked in the logging.warning earlier, we were using the root logger. That’s not normally a good idea, since any third-party package can mess with the root logger. The normal pattern is to use a logger named after the file you’re in, by using:

logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)

Logging configuration is hierarchical, so you can define "parent" loggers for top-level modules, and all the Python modules inside them will inherit that config.

Here’s how we add a logger for both our apps into settings.py:

superlists/settings.py. 

LOGGING = {
   'version': 1,
   'disable_existing_loggers': False,
   'handlers': {
       'console': {
           'level': 'DEBUG',
           'class': 'logging.StreamHandler',
       },
   },
   'loggers': {
        'django': {
            'handlers': ['console'],
        },
        'accounts': {
            'handlers': ['console'],
        },
        'lists': {
            'handlers': ['console'],
        },
    },
    'root': {'level': 'INFO'},
}

Now accounts.models, accounts.views, accounts.authentication, and all the others will inherit the logging.StreamHandler from the parent accounts logger.

Unfortunately, because of Django’s project structure, there’s no way of defining a top-level logger for your whole project (aside from using the root logger), so you have to define one logger per app.

Here’s how to write a test for logging behaviour:

accounts/tests/test_authentication.py (ch17l023). 

import logging
[...]

@patch('accounts.authentication.requests.post')
class AuthenticateTest(TestCase):
    [...]

    def test_logs_non_okay_responses_from_persona(self, mock_post):
        response_json = {
            'status': 'not okay', 'reason': 'eg, audience mismatch'
        }
        mock_post.return_value.ok = True
        mock_post.return_value.json.return_value = response_json  #1

        logger = logging.getLogger('accounts.authentication')  #2
        with patch.object(logger, 'warning') as mock_log_warning:  #3
            self.backend.authenticate('an assertion')

        mock_log_warning.assert_called_once_with(
            'Persona says no. Json was: {}'.format(response_json)  #4
        )

1

We set up our test with some data that should cause some logging.

2

We retrieve the actual logger for the module we’re testing.

3

We use patch.object to temporarily mock out its warning function, by using with to make it a context manager around the function we’re testing.

4

And then it’s available for us to make assertions against.

That gives us:

AssertionError: Expected 'warning' to be called once. Called 0 times.

Let’s just try it out, to make sure we really are testing what we think we are:

accounts/authentication.py (ch17l024). 

import logging
logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)
[...]

        if response.ok and response.json()['status'] == 'okay':
            [...]
        else:
            logger.warning('foo')

We get the expected failure:

AssertionError: Expected call: warning("Persona says no. Json was: {'status':
'not okay', 'reason': 'eg, audience mismatch'}")
Actual call: warning('foo')

And so we settle in with our real implementation:

accounts/authentication.py (ch17l025). 

    else:
        logger.warning(
            'Persona says no. Json was: {}'.format(response.json())
        )

$ python3 manage.py test accounts
[...]
Ran 15 tests in 0.033s

OK

You can easily imagine how you could test more combinations at this point, if you wanted different error messages for response.ok != True, and so on.

Wrap-Up

We now have test fixtures that work both locally and on the server, and we’ve got some more robust logging configuration.

But before we can deploy our actual live site, we’d better actually give the users what they wanted—the next chapter describes how to give them the ability to save their lists on a "My Lists" page.